Sounds to Soothe the Soul

Psychosomatic therapist Lorrel Elian, left, and local hair stylist and reiki practitioner Corrinne Ernewein play crystal bowls at Artistic Incidents on Feb. 1. The crystal ‘singing’ bowls are a tool used in natural health to explore the mind, body and spirit. Practitioners say they resonate with powerful electromagnetic frequencies. (Photo by Omar Mosleh)

Psychosomatic therapist Lorrel Elian, left, and local hair stylist and reiki practitioner Corrinne Ernewein play crystal bowls at Artistic Incidents on Feb. 1. The crystal ‘singing’ bowls are a tool used in natural health to explore the mind, body and spirit. (Photo by Omar Mosleh)

Psychosomatic therapist Lorrel Elian had enjoyed a successful career in the beauty industry, as an educator and in real estate when she realized something was missing.

And then everything became crystal clear.

“One day, you just realize ‘How come it feels so empty?’ So I began this search,’ Elian said.

That search led Elian to try and get more in touch with her spiritual side. After much soul-searching, she discovered psychosomatic therapy, which explores the connection between the mind and body and seeks to find solutions to our imbalances.

One of the tools she discovered in her journey are crystal ‘singing’ bowls, which are hollow pots made of crystalline minerals, specifically quartz and silica. When ‘played’, or struck ever-so-softly, the bowls reverberate, each with a different musical note.

“I’ve been doing this for years, and I still have challenges describing it,” Elian said. “It’s like when the opera singer hits that note, and the crystal glass breaks, that is how it works. We call that resonance.”

Elian led one of her crystal singing bowl concerts, or sound baths, in Meadow Lake on Feb. 1.

She said when the bowls resonate, they affect people in different ways, depending on their health, body and emotional state.

“The bowls resonate with our physical body,” she said. “Our physical bodies are composed of the same elements as mother earth. You have copper, zinc and magnesium in your body, and the bowls are made of crystal, quartz and silica … and you have silica in your body.”

The sound bath primarily consists of lying down and sitting with one’s eyes closed as Elian guides a meditation session and plays the bowls, which echo throughout the room at different frequencies.

“You may feel emotions or thoughts pass through your mind, colours, smells, or memories,” Elian said. “When you allow yourself to just ‘be’ in it, stuff happens.”

The bowls are made in a factory in China, where they are heated to 4,000 degrees Celsius, shaped and sent to Canada.

To Elian, they’re works of art.

“I liken them to stringed instruments — they get better or change over time,” she said.

The sound bath, which took place at local studio Artistic Incidents, lasted about an hour. When she leads a sound concert, she does not tell participants what to expect or how they will feel. She lets their inner psyche decide that for them.

“I use my bowls in my practice to show people their own ability to manifest in their lives,” she said. ‘It’s like air, oxygen or gravity; you don’t have to see it to believe it.”

Local business woman and reiki (a pseudoscience focused on healing and stress reduction) practitioner Corrinne Ernewein decided to bring Elian to Meadow Lake after having experienced a sound bath in Lloydminster.

She said sound therapy can help with releasing unbeneficial thought patterns, emotions and experiences, something she believes Meadow Lakers could use.

“I’m a hair stylist too, and a reiki master, and I work with people every day, and feel their yearning to feel better,” she said. “And I know that through sound therapy, there can be a huge relief.”

Corrinne said many of the participants described the event to her as peaceful.

Wholelife Wellness owner Cari Moffet was previously into alternative approaches to health, but said this was her first sound bath. She believes it had a positive affect on her.

“I enjoyed the guided meditation,” she said. “I felt good, I felt joyful …. I didn’t notice a change until around Sunday or Monday, and it felt like something shifted.”

The guided meditation navigates the participants through the eight major chakras, which are, according to Hindu tradition, vital points in the body serving as centers of life force. Moffet said she noticed the guided meditation changed after the fifth chakra, which is said to be located in the throat and often connected to self-expression.

“One thing I noticed is how she went really quickly on the first four chakras, and then it’s like she was stuck, or took longer on five, six and seven,” she said. ‘And I know collectively, for the town, we’re very closed in terms of expressing ourselves.”

Elian said she felt a lot of ‘heavy’ thoughts and emotions in the room following the guided meditation. To her, that’s a good thing, because it meant at least some people were able to release negative energies.

“Most people walk away saying ‘It’s not what I thought it would be,’” she said. “Because it’s about feeling, it’s about getting out of the mind and being in your physical experience.’

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